Category: Sports Psychology

How I went from competing to experiencing

I have always been highly competitive, especially in individual sports. Perhaps it is because I just love going fast, and nothing makes you feel as fast as when you come flying past your fellow competitors (the only thing that is comparable is racing downhill on my mountain bike). I...

Your mental game plan for the Argus Cycle Tour

As the time grows closer to the Argus Cycle Tour I see more and more cyclists on the road “miles in the legs” in preparation for the big day. As much as getting time in the saddle is important, consider spending some time preparing mentally for the race. Here...

Why you should Be mental about sports

You devote of hours and hours to training your body but how much to you spend training your mind? More and more, athletes and sports teams are turning to sports psychology and mental game coaching to give them the edge in training and competition. Sports psychology is a discipline...

How to perform better and have fun doing it

Whether in business or in sports, we all want to perform at our best and have fun doing it. For many of us however, optimal or peak experiences do not happen frequently enough. There are three things that impact on peak performance: our thoughts about the past, our thoughts...

How to train your brain for peak sports performance

Sport psychologist Dr. Dana Blackmer of The Extra Gear (The Extra Gear YouTube Channel) talks about what a peak mental state is and how you can determine yours. This video will help you find the "zone" that will help you perform your best in your sport....

Chasing that state called “flow”

In sport psychology the state of flow is often called "being in the zone". Flow is that internal state where time almost stops, where we meet the challenge with ease. Everything just clicks in to gear...

Being “in the zone” – on the field and in the boardroom

In an interview with the American Psychological Association, sports psychologist Dr. Shane Murphy talks about what it takes to be an Olympic athlete. The last question asked by the APA was “What does it take to do your very best when the pressure is on? You talk about being...

Perceived exertion and lactate threshold

Picture this, you've been riding for three hours and you're tired, you can feel the burn creeping into your legs, a sure sign that your body is producing more lactate than it can metabolise. You know that if you carry on at this pace you're not going to make...

Real or perceived fatigue during the Cape Argus Cycle Tour

I just completed my very first Cape Argus Cycle Tour, with a wind resisted time of 5 hours and 17 minutes. For the most part I felt really strong during the race, but there were times when all I could think of was "when will this end". I have...

Mind Over Matter – Prior experience and the perception of fatigue

Continuing on the topic of mind over matter, and specifically in relation to exercise, I am reminded of some work done by Professor Tim Noakes several years ago. Professor Noakes challenged a long established belief that fatigue originates in the muscles (when the muscles run out of oxygen, glycogen...