Are you rational?

Posted by in Cognitive Neuroscience

I’ve just read one of Seth Godin’s recent posts (you can find it here – http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2010/04/are-you-rational.html). His view is summed up in the last line of his post; “There’s room for both rational and irrational decision making, and I think we do best when we choose our path in advance instead of pretending to do one when we’re actually doing the other. The worst thing we can do...

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Perceived exertion and lactate threshold

Posted by in Cognitive Neuroscience, Sports Psychology

You may have guess that I am more than a little obsessed with the perception of fatigue. Having completed the Cape Argus Cycle Tour this weekend and having had a taste of being in the saddle for 5 hours, and then looking ahead to the Wines2Whales 3 day mountain bike stage race in November, you can imagine that the topic is very relevant for me, and hopefully for some of you other crazy folk out there. Picture this, you’ve been riding for...

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Real or perceived fatigue during the Cape Argus Cycle Tour

Posted by in Cognitive Neuroscience, Sports Psychology

I have talked about the perception of fatigue. In my previous post I mentioned that Professor Tim Noakes states that “the brain, when it senses that the athlete is overstretching him- or herself, sets off a series of sensations that the body translates as symptoms of fatigue. The brain does so to protect itself, the heart and the rest of the body. “Its main function is to make sure you don’t get into trouble in whatever exercise...

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Where did I put my keys?

Posted by in Cognitive Neuroscience, Psychology

I am always hunting for my keys, usually because I wasn’t paying attention when I put them down, or I was interrupted by something else when I walked in the door, or I put them down on Friday evening and never needed them again until Monday morning, We really don’t know why we forget things, but there are a number of possible reasons. Firstly, memories are physical, and physical things decay. Neural connections, if not reinforced...

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Could you be James Bond?

Posted by in Cognitive Neuroscience, Psychology

Do you what it takes to be a secret agent? James Bond needs to have a high  level awareness and attention. Let’s see if you make the grade. Here’s an exercise for you to do to test your awareness. Watch the video below and see how many passes the team in white makes? [gap] Attention is a “spotlight on experience”. The mechanism of attention  decides what we bring into conscious awareness and what we do not. [gap] Dan...

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Mind Over Matter – Prior experience and the perception of fatigue

Posted by in Cognitive Neuroscience, Sports Psychology

Continuing on the topic of mind over matter, and specifically in relation to exercise, I am reminded of some work done by Professor Tim Noakes several years ago. Professor Noakes challenged a long established belief that fatigue originates in the muscles (when the muscles run out of oxygen, glycogen or ATP), or when there is too much lactic acid. This model was called the “Limitations Model”. Rather, Noakes and his colleagues...

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